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Marketplace lending, financial analysis, and the future of credit : integration, profitability and risk management / Ioannis Akkizidis, Manuel Stagars.

By: Akkizidis, Ioannis S.
Contributor(s): Stagars, Manuel, 1974- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: The Wiley finance series.Publisher: Chichester : Wiley, 2016Description: xviii, 317 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781119099161 (hardback).Subject(s): Financial services industry -- Technological innovations | Credit -- Technological innovations | Risk management | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / FinanceDDC classification: 332.7 Online resources: Cover image
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Preface xvii Acknowledgments xix About the Authors xxi About the Website xxiii Introduction 1 I.1 Who is this Book For? 2 I.2 What is Fintech? 2 I.2.1 Distinction between Financial Technology Innovation and Financial Innovation 3 I.3 Why Does this Book Focus on Online Lending? 4 I.4 The Hybrid Financial Sector: The Opportunity to Build a Healthier Financial System 5 PART ONE Fintech and Online Lending Landscape--Where Are We Now? 11 CHAPTER 1 Introduction to the Business Models in Financial Technology 15 1.1 Innovation Themes in Fintech 15 1.2 The Promises and Pitfalls of Fintech Business Models 20 1.3 The Pitfalls 22 1.4 Why is Financial Technology Innovation Important? 23 1.5 Challenges and Roadblocks for Fintech Companies 24 1.6 Fintech is a Long-Term Play 26 1.7 Concluding Remarks 27 CHAPTER 2 How Does Online Lending Work? An Overview with a Focus on Marketplace Lending 29 2.1 Reliance on Technology and Data 29 2.2 How Do Online Lenders Differ From Banks? 30 2.3 Types of Online Lenders 31 2.4 Some Background on Peer-to-Peer Networks 36 2.5 The Business Model of Marketplace Lending Platforms 40 2.6 Onboarding Process 41 2.7 Comparing Marketplace Loans with Bank Credit or Credit Card Debt 44 2.8 Who are the Alternative Borrowers? 47 2.9 Who Are Investors in Marketplace Loans? 48 2.10 Underwriting and Credit Scoring 48 2.11 Regulation 49 2.12 The Response of Banks to Online Lending 51 2.13 Concluding Remarks 52 CHAPTER 3 What Made the Rise of Online Lending Possible? 57 3.1 Technological Factors 57 3.2 Social Factors 62 3.3 Structural Factors 63 3.4 The Perfect Storm 65 3.5 A Divergence of Trends 66 3.6 Concluding Remarks 67 CHAPTER 4 Why Fintech Lives Outside of Banks 69 4.1 The Technology Mudslide Hypothesis: Sustaining Innovation vs. Disruptive Innovation 70 4.2 Will Banks Notice the Next Fintech Breakthrough? 73 4.3 Why Do Banks Have Difficulty in Innovating? 76 4.4 Developing Core Competence in Financial Technology Innovation 79 4.5 Concluding Remarks 81 PART TWO The Status Quo of Analytics in the Financial Industry--The Perspective of Banks 83 P2.1 Banking is Innovation 84 P2.2 Banking Goes Mobile 84 P2.3 Banks Are Far From Dead 85 P2.4 How to Read This Part of the Book 85 P2.5 What We Discuss in This Part 86 CHAPTER 5 Financial Contracts 89 5.1 Contract Elements 89 5.2 Time in Financial Contracts 90 5.3 Contract Mechanisms Producing Financial Events 92 5.4 Concluding Remarks 106 CHAPTER 6 Markets 107 6.1 Real-world and Risk-neutral Expectations of Markets 108 6.2 Economic Scenarios Based on Real-world Probabilities 109 6.3 The Risk-neutral Expectations 110 6.4 Beyond Market Risk-Free Rates 113 6.5 Discounting Cash Flows 116 6.6 Considering Market Elements in P2P Finance 117 6.7 Concluding Remarks 118 CHAPTER 7 Counterparties 121 7.1 Types and Roles of Counterparties 121 7.2 Descriptive Characteristics 123 7.3 Default Probability 124 7.4 Credit Ratings 129 7.5 Credit Spreads Based on Real-world Probabilities 130 7.6 Link of Counterparties via Markets 131 7.7 Concluding Remarks 137 CHAPTER 8 Behavior Risk 139 8.1 Prepayments 140 8.2 Draw-downs/Remaining Principle/Facilities and Credit Lines 141 8.3 Withdrawals 143 8.4 Selling 143 8.5 Default and Downgrading 144 8.6 Use at Default 145 8.7 Recoveries 146 8.8 Concluding Remarks 147 CHAPTER 9 Credit Exposures 151 9.1 Gross Exposure 151 9.2 Net Exposure 152 9.3 Evolution of the Gross and Net Exposures 152 9.4 Exposure Distribution 155 9.5 Credit Losses 156 9.6 Link of Counterparties via Credit Exposures 157 9.7 Concluding Remarks 158 CHAPTER 10 Credit Enhancements 161 10.1 What are Credit Enhancements? Types and Structure 162 10.2 Asset-based Credit Enhancements 162 10.3 Counterparty-based Credit Enhancements 165 10.4 Additional Elements Considered in Credit Enhancements 168 10.5 Extending Credit Enhancements in Marketplace Lending 170 10.6 Concluding Remarks 175 CHAPTER 11 Systemic and Concentration Risks 177 11.1 Credit Exposure Systemic Risk 177 11.2 Counterparty Systemic Risk 180 11.3 Systemic Risk Exposures and Losses 183 11.4 Credit Exposure Concentration Risk 184 11.5 Counterparty Concentration Risk 185 11.6 Systemic Risk and Portfolio Diversification 187 11.7 Concluding Remarks 187 CHAPTER 12 Liquidity, Value, Income, Risk and New Production 189 12.1 Liquidity 190 12.2 Value and Income 197 12.3 New Production 203 12.4 Treasury and Funds Transfer Pricing (FTP) 205 PART THREE Toward the Future of the Hybrid Financial Sector 215 P3.1 Dangers of a Big Bang Approach to Catch up with Technology Innovation 216 P3.2 The Need to Collaborate in a Hybrid Financial System 217 CHAPTER 13 Profitability and Risk of Marketplace Loans 219 13.1 Underlying Assumptions of the Analysis 220 13.2 Risk Factors 222 13.3 Portfolio Construction 224 13.4 Modeling Portfolio Performance 226 13.5 Risk Management 236 13.6 The Road Forward 246 13.7 Concluding Remarks 247 CHAPTER 14 Digital Competencies and Digital Dilemmas 251 14.1 Digital Competencies 252 14.2 Digital Dilemmas 255 14.3 Concluding Remarks 260 CHAPTER 15 Digital Strategy 263 15.1 Who Needs Digital Strategy? 263 15.2 Frameworks to Analyze the Impact of Innovation 264 15.3 Spotting Signs of Trouble on the Horizon 267 15.4 How Banks Can Overcome the Innovator's Dilemma 269 15.5 From Producer to Supplier and Moving to a New Singularity 271 15.6 From Closed Innovation to Open Services Innovation 272 15.7 The Role of Leadership in Driving Emergent Strategy 273 15.8 Concluding Remarks 274 CHAPTER 16 The Hybrid Financial Sector 277 16.1 Forces of Competition in the Digital Age 277 16.2 The Dangers of Knife Fights 279 16.3 Good Ideas in Marketplace Lending That Might Be Here to Stay 280 16.4 The Alternative to the Hybrid Financial Sector: A Doomsday Scenario for Established Banks? 286 16.5 Concluding Remarks 286 CHAPTER 17 Unified Analytics 289 17.1 Why Do Marketplace Lending Platforms Need Unified Financial Analytics? 290 17.2 An Overview of a Unified Analytics Platform 296 17.3 Concluding Remarks 301 Bibliography 303 .
Summary: "The time for financial technology innovation is now Marketplace Lending, Financial Analysis, and the Future of Credit clearly explains why financial credit institutions need to further innovate within the financial technology arena. Through this text, you access a framework for applying innovative strategies in credit services. Provided and supported by financial institutions and entrepreneurs, the information in this engaging book encompasses printed guidance and digital ancillaries. Furthermore, the comprehensive text offers interviews with leaders in the field of fintech and financial technology innovation. Peer-to-peer lenders are steadily growing within the financial market. Integrating peer-to-peer lending into established credit institutions could strengthen the financial sector as a whole, and could lead to the incorporation of stronger risk and profitability management strategies. Explain (or Explore) approaches and challenges in financial analysis applied to credit risk and profitability Explore additional information provided via digital ancillaries, which will further support your understanding and application of key concepts Navigate the information organised into three subject areas: describing a new business model, knowledge integration, and proposing a new model for the Hybrid Financial Sector Understand how the rise of fintech fits into context within the current financial system Follow discussion of the current status quo and role of innovation in the financial industry, and consider the financial technology innovation landscape from the perspective of an entrepreneur Marketplace Lending, Financial Analysis, and the Future of Credit is a critical text that bridges the gap in understanding between financial technology entrepreneurs and credit institutions"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "Marketplace Lending, Financial Analysis, and the Future of Credit puts the rise of financial technology innovation into context against the inner workings of the financial system"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
Books Books Main Library: Circulation Section
HG 173 .A45 2016 (Browse shelf) c.1 Checked out Requested by College of Accountancy and Finance 02/10/2019 16-026114
Books Books PUP Unisan Library
HG 173 .A45 2016 (Browse shelf) c.1 Available Requested by PUP Unisan UNI-00042
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Machine generated contents note: Preface xvii Acknowledgments xix About the Authors xxi About the Website xxiii Introduction 1 I.1 Who is this Book For? 2 I.2 What is Fintech? 2 I.2.1 Distinction between Financial Technology Innovation and Financial Innovation 3 I.3 Why Does this Book Focus on Online Lending? 4 I.4 The Hybrid Financial Sector: The Opportunity to Build a Healthier Financial System 5 PART ONE Fintech and Online Lending Landscape--Where Are We Now? 11 CHAPTER 1 Introduction to the Business Models in Financial Technology 15 1.1 Innovation Themes in Fintech 15 1.2 The Promises and Pitfalls of Fintech Business Models 20 1.3 The Pitfalls 22 1.4 Why is Financial Technology Innovation Important? 23 1.5 Challenges and Roadblocks for Fintech Companies 24 1.6 Fintech is a Long-Term Play 26 1.7 Concluding Remarks 27 CHAPTER 2 How Does Online Lending Work? An Overview with a Focus on Marketplace Lending 29 2.1 Reliance on Technology and Data 29 2.2 How Do Online Lenders Differ From Banks? 30 2.3 Types of Online Lenders 31 2.4 Some Background on Peer-to-Peer Networks 36 2.5 The Business Model of Marketplace Lending Platforms 40 2.6 Onboarding Process 41 2.7 Comparing Marketplace Loans with Bank Credit or Credit Card Debt 44 2.8 Who are the Alternative Borrowers? 47 2.9 Who Are Investors in Marketplace Loans? 48 2.10 Underwriting and Credit Scoring 48 2.11 Regulation 49 2.12 The Response of Banks to Online Lending 51 2.13 Concluding Remarks 52 CHAPTER 3 What Made the Rise of Online Lending Possible? 57 3.1 Technological Factors 57 3.2 Social Factors 62 3.3 Structural Factors 63 3.4 The Perfect Storm 65 3.5 A Divergence of Trends 66 3.6 Concluding Remarks 67 CHAPTER 4 Why Fintech Lives Outside of Banks 69 4.1 The Technology Mudslide Hypothesis: Sustaining Innovation vs. Disruptive Innovation 70 4.2 Will Banks Notice the Next Fintech Breakthrough? 73 4.3 Why Do Banks Have Difficulty in Innovating? 76 4.4 Developing Core Competence in Financial Technology Innovation 79 4.5 Concluding Remarks 81 PART TWO The Status Quo of Analytics in the Financial Industry--The Perspective of Banks 83 P2.1 Banking is Innovation 84 P2.2 Banking Goes Mobile 84 P2.3 Banks Are Far From Dead 85 P2.4 How to Read This Part of the Book 85 P2.5 What We Discuss in This Part 86 CHAPTER 5 Financial Contracts 89 5.1 Contract Elements 89 5.2 Time in Financial Contracts 90 5.3 Contract Mechanisms Producing Financial Events 92 5.4 Concluding Remarks 106 CHAPTER 6 Markets 107 6.1 Real-world and Risk-neutral Expectations of Markets 108 6.2 Economic Scenarios Based on Real-world Probabilities 109 6.3 The Risk-neutral Expectations 110 6.4 Beyond Market Risk-Free Rates 113 6.5 Discounting Cash Flows 116 6.6 Considering Market Elements in P2P Finance 117 6.7 Concluding Remarks 118 CHAPTER 7 Counterparties 121 7.1 Types and Roles of Counterparties 121 7.2 Descriptive Characteristics 123 7.3 Default Probability 124 7.4 Credit Ratings 129 7.5 Credit Spreads Based on Real-world Probabilities 130 7.6 Link of Counterparties via Markets 131 7.7 Concluding Remarks 137 CHAPTER 8 Behavior Risk 139 8.1 Prepayments 140 8.2 Draw-downs/Remaining Principle/Facilities and Credit Lines 141 8.3 Withdrawals 143 8.4 Selling 143 8.5 Default and Downgrading 144 8.6 Use at Default 145 8.7 Recoveries 146 8.8 Concluding Remarks 147 CHAPTER 9 Credit Exposures 151 9.1 Gross Exposure 151 9.2 Net Exposure 152 9.3 Evolution of the Gross and Net Exposures 152 9.4 Exposure Distribution 155 9.5 Credit Losses 156 9.6 Link of Counterparties via Credit Exposures 157 9.7 Concluding Remarks 158 CHAPTER 10 Credit Enhancements 161 10.1 What are Credit Enhancements? Types and Structure 162 10.2 Asset-based Credit Enhancements 162 10.3 Counterparty-based Credit Enhancements 165 10.4 Additional Elements Considered in Credit Enhancements 168 10.5 Extending Credit Enhancements in Marketplace Lending 170 10.6 Concluding Remarks 175 CHAPTER 11 Systemic and Concentration Risks 177 11.1 Credit Exposure Systemic Risk 177 11.2 Counterparty Systemic Risk 180 11.3 Systemic Risk Exposures and Losses 183 11.4 Credit Exposure Concentration Risk 184 11.5 Counterparty Concentration Risk 185 11.6 Systemic Risk and Portfolio Diversification 187 11.7 Concluding Remarks 187 CHAPTER 12 Liquidity, Value, Income, Risk and New Production 189 12.1 Liquidity 190 12.2 Value and Income 197 12.3 New Production 203 12.4 Treasury and Funds Transfer Pricing (FTP) 205 PART THREE Toward the Future of the Hybrid Financial Sector 215 P3.1 Dangers of a Big Bang Approach to Catch up with Technology Innovation 216 P3.2 The Need to Collaborate in a Hybrid Financial System 217 CHAPTER 13 Profitability and Risk of Marketplace Loans 219 13.1 Underlying Assumptions of the Analysis 220 13.2 Risk Factors 222 13.3 Portfolio Construction 224 13.4 Modeling Portfolio Performance 226 13.5 Risk Management 236 13.6 The Road Forward 246 13.7 Concluding Remarks 247 CHAPTER 14 Digital Competencies and Digital Dilemmas 251 14.1 Digital Competencies 252 14.2 Digital Dilemmas 255 14.3 Concluding Remarks 260 CHAPTER 15 Digital Strategy 263 15.1 Who Needs Digital Strategy? 263 15.2 Frameworks to Analyze the Impact of Innovation 264 15.3 Spotting Signs of Trouble on the Horizon 267 15.4 How Banks Can Overcome the Innovator's Dilemma 269 15.5 From Producer to Supplier and Moving to a New Singularity 271 15.6 From Closed Innovation to Open Services Innovation 272 15.7 The Role of Leadership in Driving Emergent Strategy 273 15.8 Concluding Remarks 274 CHAPTER 16 The Hybrid Financial Sector 277 16.1 Forces of Competition in the Digital Age 277 16.2 The Dangers of Knife Fights 279 16.3 Good Ideas in Marketplace Lending That Might Be Here to Stay 280 16.4 The Alternative to the Hybrid Financial Sector: A Doomsday Scenario for Established Banks? 286 16.5 Concluding Remarks 286 CHAPTER 17 Unified Analytics 289 17.1 Why Do Marketplace Lending Platforms Need Unified Financial Analytics? 290 17.2 An Overview of a Unified Analytics Platform 296 17.3 Concluding Remarks 301 Bibliography 303 .

"The time for financial technology innovation is now Marketplace Lending, Financial Analysis, and the Future of Credit clearly explains why financial credit institutions need to further innovate within the financial technology arena. Through this text, you access a framework for applying innovative strategies in credit services. Provided and supported by financial institutions and entrepreneurs, the information in this engaging book encompasses printed guidance and digital ancillaries. Furthermore, the comprehensive text offers interviews with leaders in the field of fintech and financial technology innovation. Peer-to-peer lenders are steadily growing within the financial market. Integrating peer-to-peer lending into established credit institutions could strengthen the financial sector as a whole, and could lead to the incorporation of stronger risk and profitability management strategies. Explain (or Explore) approaches and challenges in financial analysis applied to credit risk and profitability Explore additional information provided via digital ancillaries, which will further support your understanding and application of key concepts Navigate the information organised into three subject areas: describing a new business model, knowledge integration, and proposing a new model for the Hybrid Financial Sector Understand how the rise of fintech fits into context within the current financial system Follow discussion of the current status quo and role of innovation in the financial industry, and consider the financial technology innovation landscape from the perspective of an entrepreneur Marketplace Lending, Financial Analysis, and the Future of Credit is a critical text that bridges the gap in understanding between financial technology entrepreneurs and credit institutions"-- Provided by publisher.

"Marketplace Lending, Financial Analysis, and the Future of Credit puts the rise of financial technology innovation into context against the inner workings of the financial system"-- Provided by publisher.

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